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Leveraging Bible Centered Leadership Resources

Leveraging Bible Centered Leadership Resources

This is the third and final installment of my Steve Moore interview about his new book, The Top 10 Leadership Conversations in the Bible. If you’ve been following along, by now you realize that the book is only the tip of the proverbial resource iceberg.

Besides the book’s incredibly insightful instruction, by signing up at BibleCenteredLeadership.com you can access supplemental resources involving not only Steve’s “top 10” but also keys to help you and those you lead unlock Steve’s entire inventory of the Bible’s 1090 leadership conversations and progress in becoming a truly Bible-centered leader.

Let’s continue, listen in …

The Bible’s Most Crucial Leadership Conversations

The Bible’s Most Crucial Leadership Conversations

If you read my last post, I bet you’ve been salivating for the next installment of my conversation with Steve Moore about his new book, The Top Ten Leadership Conversations in the Bible. Let’s dive right back in to the dialogue …

Ralph: I’m not sure how much you are prepared to reveal in advance of the book, but can you tell us the leadership conversations that made your top ten list?

What Can We Learn from Leadership Conversations in the Bible? Let’s Ask Steve Moore

What Can We Learn from Leadership Conversations in the Bible? Let’s Ask Steve Moore

I don’t know much of anyone I’d rather listen to or talk with about leadership than Steve Moore. As you may know, ABHE partnered with Steve to help incubate the nexleader experience and the amazing Identity Profile Self-Awareness Tool (IPSAT). I hope you, your colleagues and your students are taking full advantage of these incredible emerging leader development resource platforms.

Meanwhile, Steve has continued to build. He’s preparing to release a new book on October 1st: The Top Ten Leadership Conversations in the Bible.

Let’s Embrace and Protect Religious Colleges

Let’s Embrace and Protect Religious Colleges

Last, but not least …

We now come to the last in my series of twelve modest US higher education policy proposals. Policy proposal #12:

Confessional colleges—and not merely those that prepare professional religious workers—should be affirmed and protected by public policy. 

In many ways, I am astonished I would be called upon to advocate for such a policy. The overwhelming majority of America’s postsecondary institutions have, for the overwhelming majority of America’s history from colonial days to the present, been confessional colleges. How is it that such colleges are now regarded as, at best, un-meriting of the “postsecondary” designation and attendant religious liberty protections, if not unworthy of even the right to exist?

Conformity: neither worthy nor wise public policy

Conformity: neither worthy nor wise public policy

Diversity, not uniformity

In my previous post, “Quality peers, not quality police,” I observed that accreditation by means of peer review has produced the most diverse, envied, and emulated higher education landscape in the world. This is no private assessment. It is universally acknowledged to be true. Despite recent student visa strictures, international students continue to validate our higher education system by enrolling in huge numbers.

It stands to reason, then, when it comes to public policy, proposition #11:

Government policy should promote variety/diversity, not conformity, among postsecondary education providers.